Thursday, December 15, 2011

CIVIL WAR CLUB HOLDS MONTHLY MEETING AT MILLER CENTER

Dean Dwyer reads a letter that was sent back home from Civil War soldiers Thursday evening at its monthly meeting at the Miller Center in Pekin

The Civil War Club held its monthly meeting Thursday evening at the Miller Center in Pekin. The Club meets every 3rd Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Miller Center. Anyone may attend the meetings at no charge.

This month Dean Dwyer and Gene Lutz read letters from Civil War Soldiers that were sent back home to their loved ones. The club has been meeting for the last 20 years. Refreshments were provided.

Left: Gene Lutz (left) and Dean Dwyer (right) read letters from Civil War Troops Thursday evening







Right: Civil War Club enthusiast listen to letters from Civil War troops Thursday evening at the Miller Center read by Dean Dwyer and Gene Lutz.







Tuesday, December 13, 2011

MUSEUM RECEIVES CITY OF EAST PEORIA PROCLAMATION

The Tazewell County Museum and Educational Center received a proclamation from the City of East Peoria for helping with obtaining the Peoria to Springfield coach road declaration by the State as a historic road.

The Museum helped with research on historical information in Tazewell County and in the promotion of the request for a proclamation by the State of Illinois making it a State route. The route runs thru Tazewell County from south of Delavan to East Peoria via the Springfield road.

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

MEET PAT MOSER OF PEKIN, MUSEUM VOLUNTEER OF THE MONTH

                                                           ( Photo by Tazewell County Museum )
Pat Moser takes inventory at the Musuem recently. Here Pat inventories, a military uniform from Afghanistan donated by her Grandson, Justin Moser.


Pat Moser has been volunteering her time at the Tazewell County Museum for 3 years. She also volunteers at The Grace Methodist Church at which she is a member, and keeps a Historical scrapbook for  the Tazewell County Home Extension Office Unit 4. Her duties include but are not limited to taking inventory of all items in the Museum.

Left: Pat poses by Posters from NASA on climate change in the foyer of the Museum

Pat has been married for 53 years to her husband Robert. On their 50th Anniversary they took a trip to Kauai, Hawaii.

Pat has two sons and seven grandchildren. Her Grandson Justin Moser served in Farah Afghanistan for a year. He donated his uniform to the Museum, and is displayed in the Veterans Room.

 Her hobbies include scrap booking, reading, and playing golf.

If you would like to learn more about how you can volunteer at the Museum, please phone President Christal Dagit at 309-347-8375 or email us at tazewellcountymuseum@yahoo.com .

Monday, November 21, 2011

PEORIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY PRESENTS CHRISTAL DAGIT WITH THE GUARDIAN AWARD

                                                              ( Photo by Robert Killion-PHS )

President of the Tazewell County Museum and Educational Center, & Regional Director of the Illinois War of 1812 Bicentennial Commission Christal Dagit was recently awarded the Guardian Award by the Peoria Historical Society at the Embassy Suites in East Peoria by Vice-President of the PHS, Russ Crawford.

                     The Guardian Award, presented to Christal Dagit by the Peoria Historical Society


The award is presented to a woman from the Tri-County area who has made an outstanding contribution to the preservation of local history.

Nomination forms for the award were put in from Russ Crawford of the Peoria Historical Society, and Sharon Altman, Director of the Tazewell County Museum.

Nomination form put in by Russ Crawford, VP of the Peoria Historical Society

Nomination Form put in by Sharon Altman, Director, Tazewell County Musuem

Friday, November 18, 2011

ILLINOIS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY MEETS FOR COORDINATION MEETING ON THE WAR OF 1812 AT THE EMBASSY SUITES IN EAST PEORIA

Illinois State Historical Society


ISHS Announcement
Illinois History Symposium
Dear Friends:

The 2012 Illinois History Symposium, "Contested Lands: 1763-1840," is only a few short months away. Please put us on your calendar and let your reading audience know about this marvelous educational opportunity, which highlights Illinois's role in the War of 1812, and how the outcome of that conflict led to statehood, Native American removal, and further westward expansion.

Sincerely,
William Furry
Executive Director
Illinois State Historical Society
Like us on Facebook
2012 Symposium flier
October 16, 2011
Press Advisory
Contact:
William Furry
217-525-2781
Illinois State Historical Society plans 200th anniversary commemoration of War of 1812
The Illinois State Historical Society (ISHS), the Canadian Consulate Generalin Chicago, the French Heritage Corridor Association, and several partner museums, historical societies, and Native American organizations across the state will host the 2012 Illinois History Symposium at the Embassy Suites in East Peoria next spring. The theme of the annual conference, "Contested Lands: 1763-1840," frames the seminal events of pre- and post-Revolution America as they were played out on the frontier, including the War of 1812, an international conflict that culminated in statehood for Illinois six years later, and reestablished the national boundaries of Canada.
"The symposium commemorates the War of 1812 and provides the context for events that define our national identity today," says Christal Dagit, executive director of the Tazewell County Museum and Historical Center and Regional Director of the Illinois War of 1812 Bicentennial Commission. "The anniversary gives us an opportunity to remember a time in the development of the United States when Illinois was the far west," Dagit observed. "So much is not known about this period in our history. We need to reflect on these times when life was so hard on so many."
"The War of 1812 was a significant event in Canadian history, creating a strong national identity," said Colleen Duke, Academic and Cultural Affairs Officer at the Canadian Consulate General in Chicago. "What is most interesting is that both Canada and the United States see themselves as the victors, each for different reasons. The Consulate General is pleased to partner in this symposium and making this commemoration a significant educational opportunity for Canadians, Illinoisans, Native Americans, and modern-day residents of the Old Northwest Territory."
When the nation's 2nd war with Great Britain broke out in 1812, the present Prairie State was part of the Illinois Territory, hunting grounds for more than a dozen Native American tribes--Potawatomi, Kickapoo, Kaskaskia, Sauk, Fox, Miami, Winnebago, Menominee, Ho-Chunk, Sioux, Piankashaw, and others. The 1809 territorial map included the future states of Illinois and Wisconsin, and the northern peninsula of Michigan. Soon after war broke out, the eastern seaboard was set ablaze in several memorable battles, one that inspired our National Anthem. The Great Lakes likewise provided a backdrop for numerous bloody encounters with the British, which gave our nation several heroes. But it was on the Illinois frontier where the untested American militia went head to head (in some cases scalp to scalp) with the indigenous population, who fight mightily-and futilely-for Native Sovereignty.
"East Peoria is the perfect setting for the 2012 symposium," says ISHS executive director William Furry. "Not only was the Illinois River a principal transportation corridor for Native American tribes moving from Canada to the Mississippi River during the war, the region was the setting for several bloody engagements between the frontier militia and the Indians, engagements that set the stage for tribal removal 20 years later."
The 2012 Illinois History Symposium will look at the confluence of these various factions-English, Native American, French, Canadian, and American-and explore how these populations, in conflict and collaboration, established the identities of the nations we know today. Archaeologists, professional and amateur historians, genealogists, and other scholars will present their latest research at the symposium, providing ample opportunities for public discussion of their findings. The symposium will also include an "artifact identification" session, an opportunity for the general public to bring Illinois artifacts in for examination and identification by trained archaeologists.
The last day of the symposium will also include a Native American pow-wow, with tribal elders from several nations in attendance. Also planned throughout the commemoration are Native-American blessing ceremonies, a reconciliation offering, and several sessions devoted to the history and culture of tribes formerly indigenous to the area. There are no recognized Indian nations living in Illinois at this time.
Additional partners for the symposium are Dickson Mounds Museum in Lewistown; the French Heritage Corridor Association; The Tazewell County Museum and Historical Center; the Peoria Historical Society; the Woodford County Historical Society; the McLean County Museum of History; Daughters of Veterans of the War of 1812; the Illinois War of 1812 Bicentennial Commission; The Chicago History Museum; and the National Park Service.
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The Illinois State Historical Society held a coordination meeting at the Embassy Suites in E. Peoria Thursday morning to discuss plans marking the 200th Anniversary of the War of 1812. The symposium will be held April 26-28, 2012, at the Embassy Suites in E. Peoria.
 
Executive Director of the Illinois State Historical Society William Furry speaks about the War of 1812 symposium being planned for 2012

The Illinois State Historical Society (ISHS), the Canadian Consulate General in Chicago, the French Heritage Corridor Association, and several partner museums, historical societies, and Native American organizations across the state will host the 2012 Illinois History Symposium at the Embassy Suites in East Peoria next spring. The theme of the annual conference, “Contested Lands: 1763-1840,” frames the seminal events of pre- and post-Revolution America as they were played out on the frontier, including the War of 1812, an international conflict that culminated in statehood for Illinois six years later, and reestablished the national boundaries of Canada.

“The symposium commemorates the War of 1812 and provides the context for events that define our national identity today,” says Christal Dagit, executive director of the Tazewell County Museum and Historical Center and Regional Director of the Illinois War of 1812 Bicentennial Commission. “The anniversary gives us an opportunity to remember a time in the development of the United States when Illinois was the far west,” Dagit observed. “So much is not known about this period in our history. We need to reflect on these times when life was so hard on so many.”

“The War of 1812 was a significant event in Canadian history, creating a strong national identity,” said Colleen Duke, Academic and Cultural Affairs Officer at the Canadian Consulate General in Chicago. “What is most interesting is that both Canada and the United States see themselves as the victors, each for different reasons. The Consulate General is pleased to partner in this symposium and making this commemoration a significant educational opportunity for Canadians, Illinoisans, Native Americans, and modern-day residents of the Old Northwest Territory."

When the nation’s 2nd war with Great Britain broke out in 1812, the present Prairie State was part of the Illinois Territory, hunting grounds for more than a dozen Native American tribes--Potawatomi, Kickapoo, Kaskaskia, Sauk, Fox, Miami, Winnebago, Menominee, Ho-Chunk, Sioux, Piankashaw, and others. The 1809 territorial map included the future states of Illinois and Wisconsin, and the northern peninsula of Michigan. Soon after war broke out, the eastern seaboard was set ablaze in several memorable battles, one that inspired our National Anthem. The Great Lakes likewise provided a backdrop for numerous bloody encounters with the British, which gave our nation several heroes. But it was on the Illinois frontier where the untested American militia went head to head (in some cases scalp to scalp) with the indigenous population, who fight mightily—and futilely—for Native Sovereignty.

“East Peoria is the perfect setting for the 2012 symposium,” says ISHS executive director William Furry. “Not only was the Illinois River a principal transportation corridor for Native American tribes moving from Canada to the Mississippi River during the war, the region was the setting for several bloody engagements between the frontier militia and the Indians, engagements that set the stage for tribal removal 20 years later.”

The 2012 Illinois History Symposium will look at the confluence of these various factions—English, Native American, French, Canadian, and American—and explore how these populations, in conflict and collaboration, established the identities of the nations we know today. Archaeologists, professional and amateur historians, genealogists, and other scholars will present their latest research at the symposium, providing ample opportunities for public discussion of their findings. The symposium will also include an “artifact identification” session, an opportunity for the general public to bring Illinois artifacts in for examination and identification by trained archaeologists.

The last day of the symposium will also include a Native American pow-wow, with tribal elders from several nations in attendance. Also planned throughout the commemoration are Native-American blessing ceremonies, a reconciliation offering, and several sessions devoted to the history and culture of tribes formerly indigenous to the area. There are no recognized Indian nations living in Illinois at this time.

Additional partners for the symposium are Dickson Mounds Museum in Lewistown; the French Heritage Corridor Association; The Tazewell County Museum and Historical Center; the Peoria Historical Society; the Woodford County Historical Society; the McLean County Museum of History; Daughters of Veterans of the War of 1812; the Illinois War of 1812 Bicentennial Commission; The Chicago History Museum; and the National Park Service.

Brian Ellis who is an Author, Storyteller, Educator, and Impersonator will be helping out with the War of 1812 symposium with performances and storytelling

Christal Dagit  the Regional Director for the Illinois War of 1812 Bicentennial Commission also participated in the Coordination meeting

The Illinois Society War of 1812 will be having a Charles Schweizer Essay Contest and here are the 2011-2012 Rules



Here is a registration form for the 2012 Symposium. You can print this form off this site.







 

 


 

 

Wednesday, October 19, 2011

MEET CAROL STALLWITZ OF PEKIN, MUSEUM VOLUNTEER OF THE MONTH

                                                                         (Photos by Ed Emmons)
Carol Stallwitz of Pekin IL. has been chosen volunteer of the month for November by the Museum. Carol has been volunteering her time for 5 years at the Museum. Carol does numerous jobs at the Museum, including, recording all accessions ( putting all items donated to the Museum on the computer ), records all items that have value assigned to them, and she takes care of making sure the members list is up to date.

At 75, Carol likes to keep busy, besides volunteering at the Museum about 20 hours per month, she  also volunteers at the Tazewell County Genealogical And Historical Society. She and her husband Jim have been married for 54 years. They enjoy traveling, have their own motor home and belong to a camping club. They are getting ready shortly to depart for Alamo Texas, where they will spend the winter months.

Left: Carol Stallwitz holds a cole slaw cutter that she donated to the Museum, its about 75 years old and once belonged to her mother.

                                  UPDATE

Last month when we did our volunteer of the Month segment on Ed Schneider, WMBD-TV, Channel 31, picked up the story and came out to the Museum and did a segment on Ed, for their "Living Well" show. Somehow we thought that would air last Friday at 4 p.m., we were wrong. It has already aired on the 11th of this month. I contacted the producer today and he will contact us when its available to watch on their website. When we get that information, we will update our website.

Good luck Carol, and have a Happy Birthday on Friday. If you would like to become a volunteer at the Museum, please call Museum President Christal Dagit at 309-347-8375 on Monday or Wednesday's from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. or you can email us at tazewellcountymuseum@yahoo.com .



Monday, October 17, 2011

FIRST OFFICIAL FLYER OF THE ILLINOIS WAR OF 1812 SYMPOSIUM IN EAST PEORIA NEXT APRIL 26-28, 2012


Illinois State Historical Society


ISHS Announcement
Illinois History Symposium
Dear Friends:

The 2012 Illinois History Symposium, "Contested Lands: 1763-1840," is only a few short months away. Please put us on your calendar and let your reading audience know about this marvelous educational opportunity, which highlights Illinois's role in the War of 1812, and how the outcome of that conflict led to statehood, Native American removal, and further westward expansion.

Sincerely,
William Furry
Executive Director
Illinois State Historical Society
Like us on Facebook
2012 Symposium flier
October 16, 2011
Press Advisory
Contact:
William Furry
217-525-2781
Illinois State Historical Society plans 200th anniversary commemoration of War of 1812
The Illinois State Historical Society (ISHS), the Canadian Consulate Generalin Chicago, the French Heritage Corridor Association, and several partner museums, historical societies, and Native American organizations across the state will host the 2012 Illinois History Symposium at the Embassy Suites in East Peoria next spring. The theme of the annual conference, "Contested Lands: 1763-1840," frames the seminal events of pre- and post-Revolution America as they were played out on the frontier, including the War of 1812, an international conflict that culminated in statehood for Illinois six years later, and reestablished the national boundaries of Canada.
"The symposium commemorates the War of 1812 and provides the context for events that define our national identity today," says Christal Dagit, executive director of the Tazewell County Museum and Historical Center and Regional Director of the Illinois War of 1812 Bicentennial Commission. "The anniversary gives us an opportunity to remember a time in the development of the United States when Illinois was the far west," Dagit observed. "So much is not known about this period in our history. We need to reflect on these times when life was so hard on so many."
"The War of 1812 was a significant event in Canadian history, creating a strong national identity," said Colleen Duke, Academic and Cultural Affairs Officer at the Canadian Consulate General in Chicago. "What is most interesting is that both Canada and the United States see themselves as the victors, each for different reasons. The Consulate General is pleased to partner in this symposium and making this commemoration a significant educational opportunity for Canadians, Illinoisans, Native Americans, and modern-day residents of the Old Northwest Territory."
When the nation's 2nd war with Great Britain broke out in 1812, the present Prairie State was part of the Illinois Territory, hunting grounds for more than a dozen Native American tribes--Potawatomi, Kickapoo, Kaskaskia, Sauk, Fox, Miami, Winnebago, Menominee, Ho-Chunk, Sioux, Piankashaw, and others. The 1809 territorial map included the future states of Illinois and Wisconsin, and the northern peninsula of Michigan. Soon after war broke out, the eastern seaboard was set ablaze in several memorable battles, one that inspired our National Anthem. The Great Lakes likewise provided a backdrop for numerous bloody encounters with the British, which gave our nation several heroes. But it was on the Illinois frontier where the untested American militia went head to head (in some cases scalp to scalp) with the indigenous population, who fight mightily-and futilely-for Native Sovereignty.
"East Peoria is the perfect setting for the 2012 symposium," says ISHS executive director William Furry. "Not only was the Illinois River a principal transportation corridor for Native American tribes moving from Canada to the Mississippi River during the war, the region was the setting for several bloody engagements between the frontier militia and the Indians, engagements that set the stage for tribal removal 20 years later."
The 2012 Illinois History Symposium will look at the confluence of these various factions-English, Native American, French, Canadian, and American-and explore how these populations, in conflict and collaboration, established the identities of the nations we know today. Archaeologists, professional and amateur historians, genealogists, and other scholars will present their latest research at the symposium, providing ample opportunities for public discussion of their findings. The symposium will also include an "artifact identification" session, an opportunity for the general public to bring Illinois artifacts in for examination and identification by trained archaeologists.
The last day of the symposium will also include a Native American pow-wow, with tribal elders from several nations in attendance. Also planned throughout the commemoration are Native-American blessing ceremonies, a reconciliation offering, and several sessions devoted to the history and culture of tribes formerly indigenous to the area. There are no recognized Indian nations living in Illinois at this time.
Additional partners for the symposium are Dickson Mounds Museum in Lewistown; the French Heritage Corridor Association; The Tazewell County Museum and Historical Center; the Peoria Historical Society; the Woodford County Historical Society; the McLean County Museum of History; Daughters of Veterans of the War of 1812; the Illinois War of 1812 Bicentennial Commission; The Chicago History Museum; and the National Park Service.
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Thursday, October 13, 2011

MUSEUM POSTER DISPLAY IN ENTRY FOYER, AND OTHER MUSEUM NEWS


 (Photo by Ed Emmons)
               This poster and many others are available for viewing in the entry foyer to the Museum

The Tazewell County Museum is focusing on Magnetic Storms, Earthquakes, water, soil, and other Earths sciences. Projects involving earths sciences are being developed for children of all ages.

A note to everyone: WMBD, Channel 31 will be airing a segment called "Postcards from Home", at 4 p.m. this coming Friday. It will be on their Living Well segment. Featured in this story will be Volunteer Ed Schneider from the Museum. Ed was featured on our website September 21, 2011 as Volunteer of the month.

The meeting of the County Historical Commission on the joint War of 1812/Civil War, be be held November 10, at 7 p.m. at the Mackinaw Christian Church in Mackinaw. It is located at the intersections of Madison and Orchard Streets. The public is invited to attend, reservations are not required.

Tuesday, October 11, 2011

STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY PLANS 200TH ANNIVERSARY COMMENMORATION OF WAR OF 1812

State Historical Society plans 200th anniversary commemoration of War of 1812

The Illinois State Historical Society (ISHS), the Canadian Consulate General in Chicago, the French Heritage Corridor Association, and several partner museums, historical societies, and Native American organizations across the state will host the 2012 Illinois History Symposium at the Embassy Suites in East Peoria next spring. The theme of the annual conference, “Contested Lands: 1763-1840,” frames the seminal events of pre- and post-Revolution America as they were played out on the frontier, including the War of 1812, an international conflict that culminated in statehood for Illinois six years later, and reestablished the national boundaries of Canada.

“The symposium commemorates the War of 1812 and provides the context for events that define our national identity today,” says Christal Dagit, executive director of the Tazewell County Museum and Historical Center and Regional Director of the Illinois War of 1812 Bicentennial Commission. “The anniversary gives us an opportunity to remember a time in the development of the United States when Illinois was the far west,” Dagit observed. “So much is not known about this period in our history. We need to reflect on these times when life was so hard on so many.”

“The War of 1812 was a significant event in Canadian history, creating a strong national identity,” said Colleen Duke, Academic and Cultural Affairs Officer at the Canadian Consulate General in Chicago. “What is most interesting is that both Canada and the United States see themselves as the victors, each for different reasons. The Consulate General is pleased to partner in this symposium and making this commemoration a significant educational opportunity for Canadians, Illinoisans, Native Americans, and modern-day residents of the Old Northwest Territory."

When the nation’s 2nd war with Great Britain broke out in 1812, the present Prairie State was part of the Illinois Territory, hunting grounds for more than a dozen Native American tribes--Potawatomi, Kickapoo, Kaskaskia, Sauk, Fox, Miami, Winnebago, Menominee, Ho-Chunk, Sioux, Piankashaw, and others. The 1809 territorial map included the future states of Illinois and Wisconsin, and the northern peninsula of Michigan. Soon after war broke out, the eastern seaboard was set ablaze in several memorable battles, one that inspired our National Anthem. The Great Lakes likewise provided a backdrop for numerous bloody encounters with the British, which gave our nation several heroes. But it was on the Illinois frontier where the untested American militia went head to head (in some cases scalp to scalp) with the indigenous population, who fight mightily—and futilely—for Native Sovereignty.

“East Peoria is the perfect setting for the 2012 symposium,” says ISHS executive director William Furry. “Not only was the Illinois River a principal transportation corridor for Native American tribes moving from Canada to the Mississippi River during the war, the region was the setting for several bloody engagements between the frontier militia and the Indians, engagements that set the stage for tribal removal 20 years later.”

The 2012 Illinois History Symposium will look at the confluence of these various factions—English, Native American, French, Canadian, and American—and explore how these populations, in conflict and collaboration, established the identities of the nations we know today. Archaeologists, professional and amateur historians, genealogists, and other scholars will present their latest research at the symposium, providing ample opportunities for public discussion of their findings. The symposium will also include an “artifact identification” session, an opportunity for the general public to bring Illinois artifacts in for examination and identification by trained archaeologists.

The last day of the symposium will also include a Native American pow-wow, with tribal elders from several nations in attendance. Also planned throughout the commemoration are Native-American blessing ceremonies, a reconciliation offering, and several sessions devoted to the history and culture of tribes formerly indigenous to the area. There are no recognized Indian nations living in Illinois at this time.

Additional partners for the symposium are Dickson Mounds Museum in Lewistown; the French Heritage Corridor Association; The Tazewell County Museum and Historical Center; the Peoria Historical Society; the Woodford County Historical Society; the McLean County Museum of History; Daughters of Veterans of the War of 1812; the Illinois War of 1812 Bicentennial Commission; The Chicago History Museum; and the National Park Service.

##30##

William Furry

William Furry
Executive Director
Illinois State Historical Society
217-525-2781
FAX: 217-525-2783
wfurry@sbcglobal.net
www.historyillinois.org

Friday, September 23, 2011

TAZEWELL COUNTY COMMISSION OF THE WAR OF 1812/CIVIL WAR HOLDS MEETING THURSDAY EVENING

                                                                           (Image by Robert Thom)

The Tazewell County Commission on the War of 1812/Civil War held a meeting last night at the Tazewell County Genealogical and History Society in Pekin. Christal Dagit, Regional Director of the Illinois War of 1812 Bicentennial Commission conducted the meeting.

The Commission discussed how they would go about finding all Veterans of the War of 1812, and where they were buried. So far no Veterans have been located in Pekin or E. Peoria. A total of 26 Veterans are believed to be from Tazewell County.

A three day symposium is being planned for April 26-28 at the Embassy Suites, East Peoria. The Tazewell County Museum will host a luncheon at the symposium and is selling lapel pins that will come with a postcard with the image that is shown( above ) for $5 to offset the cost. You may contact the Tazewell County Museum at 347-8375 to purchase the pins or email us at tazewellcountymuseum@yahoo.com or dagit@comcast.net.

The following shows what the lapel pins look like and the second image is of the back of the postcard with information concerning the symposium.



The War of 1812 on PBS in October

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The War of 1812: Monday, October 10 at 9 p.m. ET
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Project News

Celebrate the War of 1812 with the multi-media PBS project The War of 1812
This e-newsletter is dedicated to The War of 1812, a comprehensive project from public broadcaster WNED that includes a film for PBS, companion book, educational resources and a content-rich website. Join us in celebrating this important war!
The two-hour film history airs on PBS stations nationwide on Monday, October 10, 2011 at 9 p.m. ET (check local listings). Filmed by award-winning documentarians Lawrence Hott and Diane Garey and narrated by Joe Mantegna, the film explores when, from 1812 to 1815, Americans battled against the British, Canadian colonists, and Native warriors. The outcomes shaped the geography and the identity of North America.
Across the United States and Canada, communities are planning events to commemorate the 200th Anniversary of the War of 1812. We will send you updates about The War of 1812 and other Bicentennial plans.
Want to Host a Screening? If your organization would like to host a screening of The War of 1812 in your community, please contact Christy May at WNED.
War of 1812 Web TileWant to Tell Others? You can easily forward this e-newsletter. Or download the web button to the right for your own website. Also, the project has developed posters, postcards and other materials for The War of 1812. To request electronic files, or for other questions, please contact Kate Kelly at WETA.

Watch a Clip

Watch a Clip
Watch a trailer for The War of 1812. View the entire film Monday, October 10, 2011 at 9 p.m. ET on PBS (check local listings).
Learn more about the War of 1812: Buy the book and DVD
The War of 1812 Mobile App
A Bi-National Bicentennial
The Niagara 1812 Legacy Council invites everyone to celebrate the 200th Anniversary. They aim to build bi-national community awareness of the importance of the War of 1812 events to US/Canada relations.
We will feature other Bicentennial plans here in future e-newsletters.

Featured Battle Site

National Park Service Fort McHenry
Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine Baltimore, Maryland, USA
Visit the fort that defended Baltimore against the British invasion in the War of 1812, and the birthplace of the National Anthem.
Did You Know? When news of the Declaration of War reached Baltimore, some ship owners began turning their vessels into privateers. These privately owned ships were given permission from the government to capture British merchant ships. Soon, Baltimore was described as “a nest of pirates,” and the British were determined to put an end to privateering. (Text courtesy NPS.)

Educational News

War of 1812 Educators Guide
Educators Guides Available Now
The War of 1812 project includes lesson plans for students in elementary, middle and high school. They are available now from the project website pbs.org/1812. Every attempt has been made to ensure that the plans are congruent with bi-national learning standards for the United States and Canada. The lessons typically use program segments and broad thematic strands, and they integrate and honor the contributions of all groups involved in the War. Many of the activities are multidisciplinary, incorporating areas such as English Language Arts, music and art.
WNED: Buffalo/TorontoWETA Washington, D.C.PBS
The War of 1812 is a production of WNED-TV, Buffalo/Toronto and Florentine Films/Hott Productions Inc., in association with WETA Washington, D.C.
National Endowment for the HumanitiesThe Wilson FoundationWarren and Barbara GoldringCorporation for Public BroadcastingThe Arthur Vining Davis FoundationsPhil LindThe Annenberg Foundation
With additional support from The Baird Foundation, Niagara Falls Bridge Commission and Jackman Foundation.
Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
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